Legal Age to work in the Philippines (DOLE)

legal age to work - DOLE_Logo101206The Philippines’ Department of Labor and Employment

My wife’s sister, who is really a half sister, is graduating from high school at the age of 16…the year 2015 is maybe the last year high school will graduate at 16.

My question is “why are they not allowing those between the ages of 16-18 to work even if a worker’s permit might be required?” In the USA, back in the early 80s, maybe 70s, we were allowed to work but not past 10pm and if it was a holiday, we could work on that day, as long as it did not conflict with school….my first job was at a fast-food called “Jack N’ the Box” and I made more than the minimum wage which made one of my sisters jealous.

The Philippines’ Department of Labor and Employment, under Republic Act No. 9231 (December 19, 2003), claims:

“(3) No child below fifteen (15) years of age shall be allowed to work between eight o’clock in the evening and six o’clock in the morning of the following day and no child fifteen (15) years of age but below eighteen (18) shall be allowed to work between ten o’clock in the evening and six o’clock in the morning of the following day.”

It very much seems to be saying what those in the USA have to abide by, but what is strange is that most of the kids, for the past 10, plus years, legally was a graduate from high school and they still are not allowed to work in a fast-food, grocery store or an SM.

To legally be a graduate without the ability to work, because of what they say the DOLE is claiming, waists two very important years of a person’s life.

WHY!?

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